The SURVIVOR Project

Read the true stories of sexual assault and abuse survivors, paired with their portraits. As told by the survivors and transcribed by Arnold, survivors take a stand to voice what they have gone through in hopes of others never having to go through it themselves.

Susan Arnold presents her second published work, The SURVIVOR Project.

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Stop Degrading Liberal Art Degrees

At what point did I, or we, if this applies to you as well, accept the stereotype of liberal art majors? When did we stop defending ourselves? Reading Silva’s essay opened my eyes. I had already known that the stereotype against English majors existed, but I never realized how strongly it prevailed.

As a double major in Photography (an art degree) and Writing (an English degree), I receive double the amount of heat. I jokingly switch between the two depending on the situations I am in. (For example, being with my two very left-brained biology degree friends while they discuss anatomy: “What? I’m an art major!”) The fact that I switch between my majors and willingly degrade myself to those with “harder” degrees, shows just how much this stereotype has permeated into daily life.

In the essay, Silva states “But as far as I’ve seen, none of the stereotypes of a STEM or hard science major undermine their future and choices. That’s exactly what the stereotypes and stigmas surrounding liberal arts majors do.” Throughout my college career, I have had people assume that I want to be a journalist (I do not like factual writing), doubted that my Writing major was a real degree (‘It sounds fake.’) and ask what I plan on doing because neither of my degrees guarantees me a job. When in all actuality, everything that we associate with on a daily basis deals with writing or photography, specifically social media and advertisements.

I believe in the art of storytelling. And I also believe that I can change society, even if that change is small. The moment I stop doubting myself, my abilities and my degrees is the moment that I start to change the minds of those around me.

Review for ‘The Song of Achilles’

The Song of Achilles by Madeline MillerDNF!

I did not even make it 100 pages into this book. I tried, really I did. There were entire passages of description that could have been taken out. The book could have been much shorter if, rather than describe every unimportant detail, Miller had just gotten to the point. I get it, show don’t tell, but readers do not need to see every detail. I’m truly disappointed because I had such high hopes for this book and it let me down.

It was too slow paced and I really just couldn’t get into it.

 

I give it a 1/5 star rating.

‘There’s Someone Inside Your House’ Review


I was thoroughly spooked.

The book was great until the end. Like I said, I was thoroughly spooked and had to speed read the entire thing so that I could actually fall asleep. (I still ended up having nightmares after I finished it.)

When I was reading, the story felt very well paced, it wasn’t rushed and it didn’t try to build up for too long. Yet, when I got to the end, I feel like there were a number of problems that went unresolved. I want to know what happened to the town and the people impacted by the murders. I want to know how the protagonist grows and moves on. I want to know how her relationship with her parents evolves.

There are so many things that I want to know, but never will.

The book just ends too abruptly for me. It’s a satisfying ending, but there are so many things that could have been explained.

 

Overall, I gave it a three out of five stars.

‘Batman: Nightwalker’ Review

Let me start this review by saying that Batman is my favorite superhero, so I went into this extremely excited to have a fresh take on the Caped Crusader.

Ultimately, I was disappointed. I enjoyed many parts of the book, how little hints of who Bruce would become were woven throughout the chapters, but I’ve seen this plot before, specifically in DC Icons, #1 Wonder Woman: Warbringer. Similarly to Warbringer, there is a rich kid whose father loves their friend more than them in Nightwalker, we also had a similar plottwist involving one of the rich characters (which I won’t describe) in Warbringer, though the plottwist their is more important than here.

Also, every time Madeleine, the antagonist, was described, the words ‘lushous lashes’ followed. I get it, she has good lashes, but every time she is mentioned in the story I don’t need to be reminded of it.

The initial description of Arkham Asylumn reminds me of the prison in Lauren Oliver’s Pandemonium. And the VR gym that Bruce goes to has to be invented soon because I want to go to a gym like that!

I am disappointed that Nightwalker recycled Warbringer’s plot and I am really hoping that Catwoman: Soulstealer doesn’t do the same, otherwise this series of four could turn into the same book with different titles and characters. Here’s to hoping that Catwoman can redeem the DC Icons series.

‘The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett’ Review

This is a book that I rented from Overdrive, and I am so glad that I didn’t waste my own money on it.

The protagonist, Hawthorn, acted like a twelve-year-old for the entirety of the novel. It was very stand-offish to read a YA book that had somebody who acted like a middle schooler as the main character. She was never focused on anything, except obsessing over Lizzie Lovett. She was rude, inconsiderate, childish and didn’t take anything seriously. She was vengeful and misunderstanding. Frankly, she treated the characters around her like trash and they didn’t deserve to be treated that way. She was self-obsessed and self-absorbed and the only thing that stopped her from thinking about herself was her ridiculous fantasies.

Furthermore, all of the characters were flat. The was no development beyond ‘mean popular girl’ or ‘outcast best friend’ or ‘professor dad’ and ‘hippie mom’. The only interactions between Hawthorn and her father felt forced. It was as though the dad existed to fill a role, not to be a character.

The title for this work should have been “Probably Maybe” because it was written more times than the words “Lizzie Lovett”.

To be honest, I’m not sure how this work was published, let alone how it has a 3.25 overall Goodreads rating.

The Problem With Forever | Review

When I first started this book, I listened to the audio version, I was excited. The prologue was full of action and intrigue and made me want to continue on and learn more about the characters.

And then the actual story started.

First off, I noticed that the prologue was in third-person and the rest of the story was in first-person. That threw me off. I thought that there was maybe something wrong with the audiobook. I was really excited for the storyline to continue through from the prologue, but it almost instantly took a different turn.

It took over half of the book to figure out what had happened to the main character, Malory, through segmented flashbacks. The flashbacks connected to the prologue, which was good and bad. Good because there was a connection between the actual story and the very beginning. Bad because the flashbacks were choppy and incomplete, a contrast to the straightforwardness of the prologue. It should not take over half of a book to understand why the protagonist is the way they are. I wanted to know far sooner.

I was also looking forward to this being a coming of age story that came full circle. That did not happen. It was rather slow and turned into a love story and I don’t think it ever came full circle. I feel like half of the book could have been cut out and it would have been the same story, that’s how excessive and slow it was.

Overall, the beginning was great and super intriguing, but the slowness and the falling back into typical love story YA cliches ruined the book for me.