Review for EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING

Everything, Everything by Nicola YoonThis book redefines the YA genre. This inspirational layout is different from any other book I’ve read. EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING is easy to read and heart touching. I think I would have given it a 6/5 if I hadn’t had already seen the movie. (Don’t be mad! It was mother/daughter bonding.)
On the note of already seeing the movie (which I also recommend), it was intriguing to see how the directors adapted the IM, texting, and illustrations from the book to the big screen.
The illustrations really allow the reader to get into the head of Maddy, the protagonist, by seeing the world how she sees it. They also break up the text in ways that make the reading very fast.

Overall, I give it a 5/5.

Review for ‘The Song of Achilles’

The Song of Achilles by Madeline MillerDNF!

I did not even make it 100 pages into this book. I tried, really I did. There were entire passages of description that could have been taken out. The book could have been much shorter if, rather than describe every unimportant detail, Miller had just gotten to the point. I get it, show don’t tell, but readers do not need to see every detail. I’m truly disappointed because I had such high hopes for this book and it let me down.

It was too slow paced and I really just couldn’t get into it.

 

I give it a 1/5 star rating.

‘Turtles All the Way Down’ Review

John Green possesses a way with words that makes me contemplate life every time I read one of his works. In ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ it was “Some infinities are bigger than other infinities” in ‘Looking for Alaska’ it was “How long is an instant?” (a quote which actually inspired a story I plan to write). In ‘Turtles All the Way Down’ it was “No one ever says goodbye unless they want to see you again.”

Usually, when I read John Green books, I fall in love with the story but cringe the entire time I read it because I cannot stand his writing style. Yet, in ‘Turtles All the Way Down’ I did not cringe. I really enjoyed Green’s writing style for this one. I am sure if it is the same as his previous books and I have just matured or if he is writing differently now that he has finally returned.

I loved the protagonist’s name: Aza. Named because her parents wanted to give her the whole alphabet, wanted to give her all of the possibilities it had to offer. If that’s not romantic I don’t know what is.

I found Aza to be incredibly relatable, and I don’t know if that is something that I should be wary of (read the story to know why). The way her mind works reminds me of how my mind works. I think that’s why I enjoy writing. When I write, I create a physical proof of my thoughts, I get them out of my head and free up storage. Though my thoughts are not as severe as Aza’s I can relate to feeling trapped in one’s own mind.

Daisy, Aza’s best friend, gives a good sense of reality, even though she pretty much lives in her fan fiction. Her and Aza get into a fight at one point throughout the novel, and it was a reality check to me–the reader, not just Aza. That’s something rare in a book, at least how I see it.

The ending was justified, which is something I think that John Green is good about doing. He never creates a far-fetched ending. The ending was practical and realistic and made sense for all of the characters involved, which is something I enjoyed.

This book. I really don’t know how to explain it. But it reached me. Now, as I’m writing this review, the plot and the words are spiraling in my mind. I can only think of the book. How it will stay with me.

Final rating: 5/5

The Truth About Forever | A short review

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I thoroughly enjoyed Dessen’s TAF. The characters were well developed. though I was sometimes wanting more development, and Wes is absolutely charming. I felt that, though the relationship between Macy, the protagonist, and her mother was explained, along with the way Macy tended to act, that it just wasn’t realistic, at least to me. And, the ending was somewhat predictable.