Review for EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING

Everything, Everything by Nicola YoonThis book redefines the YA genre. This inspirational layout is different from any other book I’ve read. EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING is easy to read and heart touching. I think I would have given it a 6/5 if I hadn’t had already seen the movie. (Don’t be mad! It was mother/daughter bonding.)
On the note of already seeing the movie (which I also recommend), it was intriguing to see how the directors adapted the IM, texting, and illustrations from the book to the big screen.
The illustrations really allow the reader to get into the head of Maddy, the protagonist, by seeing the world how she sees it. They also break up the text in ways that make the reading very fast.

Overall, I give it a 5/5.

‘Artemis’ Review

Artemis is one of the best books I’ve read in a long time. I borrowed the copy I read but you can bet that I am going to buy myself one. Yeah, it was that good. (5/5 stars.) At one point, I even dreamed that I lived in the city on the moon.

One thing that I really loved about the book was the writing style. This is the first I’ve read any of Andy Weir’s work, so I didn’t know anything about his style going in. In Artemis, the style is very realistic, it’s practically stream of consciousness. It seemed as if the protagonist, Jazz, was having a conversation with the reader, or giving a confession. At times, the fourth wall was broken to actually address the reader. It worked very well for Jazz and her personality. I think that it was the best way to go about the setting, as well. Very few people have ever been to the moon. The way that Jazz interacts with the reader, and how realistically the story was written, make it much easier for the readers to understand how life in Artemis and life on the moon (yes, they’re different, a city has politics and the moon has different gravity) work.

Something that was obvious from the get-go was how much research Andy Weir put into this book.

Or, he’s really good at making things up.

There was a lot of chemistry and math, a lot of information about welding and physics and aerodynamics. It blew me away how tediously he researched everything. I learned a lot about gravity and space travel. The novel didn’t seem too information heavy, either, which is usually hard to do given how much explaining is needed for the general population to understand not only the basics of how Artemis works as a city, but how Jazz functions in her day to day life and how she completes her mission that compels the rest of the story.

I also enjoyed how diverse the story was. Jazz is Saudia Arabian, all of Artemis is possible because of Kenya, the aluminum is made on the moon by a Brazillian company. Honestly, I think the only recurring white character is Rudy, and he’s a rude Canadian (a character type that we don’t usually see…I’m talking about Canadians, not rude Canadians). It was very refreshing to read a book where the protagonists aren’t white Americans in a post-apocalyptic world or a John Green novel.

What? I’m not salty.

There was one thing that did confuse me while reading, though. Sporadically, throughout chapters, there were emails between Jazz and a character named Kelvin. This isn’t much of a spoiler, but if you don’t want to know anything AT ALL about the book, then skip this paragraph. These emails start off in the past to help establish Jazz and Kelvin’s relationship, as well as help explain how Jazz ended up where she is at the start of the novel. While reading, I thought that the emails were in real-time, which confused me because the events that Jazz relayed to Kelvin didn’t add up. If the emails had been time-stamped or said that they started 9 to 10 years previously, it would have cleared up the confusion that I had. I didn’t realize that the emails were taking place in the past until they caught up with the present, over halfway through the book.

The reason that I wanted to read Artemis is because Artemis is my favorite Greek goddess, so there is really no connection between the two other than the name of the city. Though this wasn’t a story about Greek heroes, I was not let down at all. This book gave me a rollercoaster of a ride and a rollercoaster of emotions. I recommend you pick up a copy.

‘There’s Someone Inside Your House’ Review


I was thoroughly spooked.

The book was great until the end. Like I said, I was thoroughly spooked and had to speed read the entire thing so that I could actually fall asleep. (I still ended up having nightmares after I finished it.)

When I was reading, the story felt very well paced, it wasn’t rushed and it didn’t try to build up for too long. Yet, when I got to the end, I feel like there were a number of problems that went unresolved. I want to know what happened to the town and the people impacted by the murders. I want to know how the protagonist grows and moves on. I want to know how her relationship with her parents evolves.

There are so many things that I want to know, but never will.

The book just ends too abruptly for me. It’s a satisfying ending, but there are so many things that could have been explained.

 

Overall, I gave it a three out of five stars.

‘Beauty Queens’ Review

Rating: 2/5 stars
This is also a book that I listened to from Overdrive.

Don’t let the two star rating discourage you, this book was good AND funny. I suggest listening to it on audiobook, the author, Libba Bray, is the one who reads it. She turned it into a production, doing multiple different voices and even taking commercial breaks. It was hilarious! I wish every audiobook was made into a production like Bray made ‘Beauty Queens’.

This book is ‘Lord of the Flies’ meets America’s Next Top Model. I couldn’t put it down–er, I couldn’t stop listening to it.

If it was so good, why did I give it such a low rating, you’re wondering.

Though I couldn’t stop listening, I couldn’t get over how much of a parody this book was. Everything was to be taken with a grain of salt. I didn’t get anything out of this book. If the characters didn’t have an alternative agenda when they joined the pagent (like taking it down from the inside or being the first ****spoiler!**** trans person to win the pagent *end spoiler*) then they were just dumb pagent bimbos, unfortuenately.

If this book had been written in a more serious manner, it would have recieved a higher rating from me.

‘The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett’ Review

This is a book that I rented from Overdrive, and I am so glad that I didn’t waste my own money on it.

The protagonist, Hawthorn, acted like a twelve-year-old for the entirety of the novel. It was very stand-offish to read a YA book that had somebody who acted like a middle schooler as the main character. She was never focused on anything, except obsessing over Lizzie Lovett. She was rude, inconsiderate, childish and didn’t take anything seriously. She was vengeful and misunderstanding. Frankly, she treated the characters around her like trash and they didn’t deserve to be treated that way. She was self-obsessed and self-absorbed and the only thing that stopped her from thinking about herself was her ridiculous fantasies.

Furthermore, all of the characters were flat. The was no development beyond ‘mean popular girl’ or ‘outcast best friend’ or ‘professor dad’ and ‘hippie mom’. The only interactions between Hawthorn and her father felt forced. It was as though the dad existed to fill a role, not to be a character.

The title for this work should have been “Probably Maybe” because it was written more times than the words “Lizzie Lovett”.

To be honest, I’m not sure how this work was published, let alone how it has a 3.25 overall Goodreads rating.

The Problem With Forever | Review

When I first started this book, I listened to the audio version, I was excited. The prologue was full of action and intrigue and made me want to continue on and learn more about the characters.

And then the actual story started.

First off, I noticed that the prologue was in third-person and the rest of the story was in first-person. That threw me off. I thought that there was maybe something wrong with the audiobook. I was really excited for the storyline to continue through from the prologue, but it almost instantly took a different turn.

It took over half of the book to figure out what had happened to the main character, Malory, through segmented flashbacks. The flashbacks connected to the prologue, which was good and bad. Good because there was a connection between the actual story and the very beginning. Bad because the flashbacks were choppy and incomplete, a contrast to the straightforwardness of the prologue. It should not take over half of a book to understand why the protagonist is the way they are. I wanted to know far sooner.

I was also looking forward to this being a coming of age story that came full circle. That did not happen. It was rather slow and turned into a love story and I don’t think it ever came full circle. I feel like half of the book could have been cut out and it would have been the same story, that’s how excessive and slow it was.

Overall, the beginning was great and super intriguing, but the slowness and the falling back into typical love story YA cliches ruined the book for me.

‘The Female of the Species’ Review

Now, I don’t just give out five-star ratings. But I absorbed this book. I first spotted it about a month and a half ago at a bookstore and finally purchased it yesterday. I read the first three chapters last night before bed and finished it just a few moments ago, in only twenty-five hours.

Instantly gripping and constantly compelling, this book was a rollercoaster of a ride. At first, I was a little bit frustrated because there were parts that were a mystery and all I wanted to know was the answer. As I continued to read I was transfixed (it’s cram-before-exams week in college, to give up any time is a rarity, so you know this is an honest review). I fell for all of the characters, even those who aren’t protagonists.

I felt that the depiction of high school was a bit exaggerated, but the language and thought process of the characters seemed incredibly accurate. McGinnis did an incredible job making me care about the characters so much so that I cried at the end; she painted villains as heroes and did a good chunk of storytelling through dialogue. Though the topics of the book are a bit on the heavy side, and some passages can be triggering to some audiences, The Female of the Species is a pretty easy read, the longest chapter wasn’t more than five pages.

McGinnis did justice to the split point of view narration, developing each protagonist in their own way and making sure that none of their personalities blurred together. While reading, I never felt like any part of the book was over the top or unbelievable and writing something like this could have easily gone that way.

 

Rating: ★★★★★