The SURVIVOR Project

Read the true stories of sexual assault and abuse survivors, paired with their portraits. As told by the survivors and transcribed by Arnold, survivors take a stand to voice what they have gone through in hopes of others never having to go through it themselves.

Susan Arnold presents her second published work, The SURVIVOR Project.

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ABOUT

20180714_163313I’m Susan Arnold and I’m a twenty-something Michigan based photographer.

I started doing photography seriously in 2013 but began taking photos in 2006 when I got my first camera as a birthday present. I graduated from Northern Michigan University with a bachelor’s in science in photography in May 2019.

I focus on multiple types of photography, primarily portraiture and landscape. If you book with me, I offer competitive prices for on-location shoots (I will travel if you need me to).

I hope you enjoy scrolling through my views of the world.

 

You can find me on social media here:

http://instagram.com/susanarnold_

https://www.facebook.com/sarnoldphotography/

BOOKINGS

Senior Sessions – $125

  • 2 hours
  • 3 outfit changes
  • photos edited without manipulation
  • all rights go to you

Engagement Sessions – $250*

  • 3 hours
  • 3 outfit changes
  • photos edited without manipulation
  • all rights go to you

*depending on how long of a commute, travel fees will be added on to the price

Elopement/Courthouse Weddings – $300

  • 3 hours
  • shooting on location
  • 3 outfit changes
  • photos edited without manipulation
  • all rights go to you

Weddings – $1500*

  • all day
  • shooting on location
  • a meeting beforehand to discuss what you want for your special day
  • photos edited without manipulation
  • all rights go to you

*depending on how long of a commute, travel fees will be added on to the price

 

 

Photobooks are available upon request. There will be extra fees.

 

Turnaround for editing is typically a 7-10 business days. Longer if including a photobook.

Notes: ISO, Shutter Speed & Aperture!

Exposure

-exposure controls how light and/or dark an image is
-it’s the mixture of all three pillars of photography: ISO, shutter speed and aperture

ISO
-iso is the level of sensitivity of camera to available light
-the lower the level, the less sensitive, the higher= more sensitive
-base iso is the lowest iso number of the sensor, that can produce the highest image quality, without adding noise to the image. Ranges:100-200 (base iso), 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400. Each step in between doubles sensitivity
-With increased sensitivity, there can be more graining

Shutter Speed

-shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter is open
-it’s measured in seconds and fractions of seconds
-slow shutter speeds require tripods and cause blurriness to moving objects
-want a fast shutter speed for taking pictures of sports or flying birds etc.
-want a slow shutter speed if you want to capture paint drying, or a snail moving, stuff like that

Aperture
-aperture is the hole in the lens that lets light into the camera body (the pupil of your eye is the aperture of photography)
-adds dimension by blurring background and bringing subject into focus or makes everything in focus
-diaphragm: stops or blocks light, with the exception of the light that goes through the aperture
-expressed in f-numbers, which are described as f-stops
-f-stops describe the size of the aperture; the bigger the number, the smaller the hole
-if you want the subject in better focus, use a larger f-number. The smaller the hole, the more in focus the subject and the blurrier the background

Composition| Photography Tips For Beginners

If you’re new to photography, and don’t know where to start, I’ve got your back!

Jumping into the world of photography can be a struggle, so I’m going to share my notes from my various photography classes with you, hoping that they help! This first lesson (can we call it that? let’s go with it.) is all about composition, so you can make your photographs as pleasing to the eye as possible!

(Keep in mind that you can’t possibly follow all of these “guidelines” in one picture! Feel free to experiment; the most important ones (to me at least) are the Rule of Thirds and putting the horizon line on one of the Rule of Thirds lines.)

 

  • Rule of Thirds
    • 3×3 frame, don’t put the subject in middle, put it on one of the lines or where they intersect!
    • imagine a number sign, or as our generation says, a hashtag (#)
    • basically, don’t put anything in the centre of your photograph
  • Balance Elements
    • have something on each side
    • imagine the picture as a scale
  • Leading Lines
    • use elements of the scene to create a lined pattern that will draw the viewers eye and allow the eye to follow the lines
    • horizontal lines= static and calm, vertical= permanence and stability, diagonal= drama movement and uncertainty
  • Symmetry and Patterns
    • makes it eye catching
    • creates tension
  • Viewpoint
    • i.e. an upwards angle creates a more powerful feel
    • angle down on the subject (wimpy, sympathetic), angle sideways
    • IDEA! take a picture from lying on your back to get different view
  • Background
    • don’t make it too busy
    • don’t keep it too much in focus, blur it a bit
  • Depth
    • here is where the idea of “you can’t use all of these in one picture” comes in, above I said not to have the background in focus, where below it’ll say to have it in focus. it all depends how you want YOUR picture to be
    • objects in fore, middle and background; layer
  • Framing
    • have stuff around the edge to isolate main subject
    • if you’re taking a picture of a vacant street, use the buildings on both sides to frame it
  • Cropping
    • crop around [small] subject to get rid of noise in background
  • Simplify the Scene
      • basically get rid of clutter, make the background bare or as less busy as possible
    • Use silhouettes by putting the light behind the subject
    • Fill the frame
      • don’t leave empty space
      • zoom in as close as possible to a subject

 

  • Space to Move
    • humans look ahead; if you’re taking a picture of car headed to the left, then leave some empty space to the left of it
  • Colours
    • contrast, not same shade: blue and orange, purple and yellow, red and green, black and white!
  • Use odd numbers
    • more appealing to the eye
    • take a picture of three under water basket weavers instead of two
  • Texture
    • creates dimension (brick, cement, velvet, etc.)
  • Horizontal Line
    • do not put in middle of frame
    • above or below, depending on the image
  • Lean into Frame
    • when photographing animals and people, have them looking into camera

 

 

 

Good luck! Tweet me your pictures @susanarnold_ or tag me in them on Instagram with @susanarnold_