Week Four in London!

Day One

The final class meeting for session one. We had a literary scavenger hunt throughout central London. We ran around like chickens with our heads cut off, luckily, we came in second place!

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From left to right: myself, Tyler, Megan, Ally, and Isabella. We were on a mission to win!

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We found St. Paul’s [Actor’s] Church
After the scavenger hunt, a group of us went with Dr. G to a pop-up exhibition of graphic designs that helped create the Harry Potter cinematic universe, it was really cool to see all of the little details that went into creating the films.

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Right around the corner from this little gallery is an all vegetarian/vegan menu pub. I will 100% be going there!
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This place had Hogwarts letters posted EVERYWHERE.

On the way to campus, we ended up at the National Gallery Museum!

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Monet.
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Van Gogh.

After returning to campus and doing my laundry, a group of us went out to find a pub showing England in the world cup and to celebrate for those who were only staying for the first session. Eventually, we ended up at the Toyshop, which we had gone to for the cocktail night. After the game, there was a live band that played until close.

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The squad.

 

Day Two

I slept in for the first time in what felt like months, then went to the library to work on editing some photography with Jeff. After that, Sydney, Caleb, Jeff and I hunted down Abbey Road and Baker Street.

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If you didn’t know, this is an actual road, that gets used. We were literally dodging buses and cars.

We took the bus back from central London during rush hour, it took forever and I think I fell asleep. The day ended with all of us plus Ally and Carter watching Back to the Future in my kitchen.

Day Three

I took another lazy day. I slept in, finished a movie and watched five episodes of Brooklyn 99. Said goodbye to some good friends. Hung out with some good friends; we fed the birds and narrowly missed being attacked by some swans and geese. Then, Sydney made dinner for all of us. I also finally beat level 47 of Mr. Bean, which I had been stuck on for over a month.

Day Four

Caleb, Sydney and I took Jeff out for a goodbye brunch.

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Check out this delicious vegetarian breakfast burrito.

Afterward, we dodge a crowded bus, walked through a park, found a weird Santa toy and ended up feeding the birds again. There is a duck that will eat out of your hand. Sydney named her Stacy.

Day Five

The first day of class for session two. I’m in a writing class titled Hidden London. We explore the city and works about it and then write about London. This class has a bit more demanding workload than the last one, but it still seems fun. Tyler and I grabbed a table in the library after class to work on final papers from the other class and homework from our new class. I said goodbye to Jeff. Then a group of us went to see Oceans 8. It was okay.

Day Six

Had class and spent some time in the library. Then went on a Jack the Ripper Walking Tour with the social programme. This one was a bit better than the one that I went on in my session one class.

Day Seven

Happy fourth to all of my friends and family across the pond! My class went on an excursion to the White Chapel area of London. If you’re ever in the city and want to look at some awesome street art, check out Brick Lane.

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Save the bees.

We also visited the White Chapel Gallery, which was doing an exhibit on Dead Negatives of the Great Depression, focusing on photographers who shot for the FSA.

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The hole in the photos are from a hole-punch because the photos were deemed unsuitable/unusable for the propaganda.

After class, I tried some charity shops in search of clothes that won’t cook me in this odd heat wave (I packed for chilly, rainy London, not 80s-90s, sunny and droughty). I also went grocery shopping, as I had no food for breakfast. Pray for rain.

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After College Portfolio Tips

So you’ve graduated college and you don’t know what to do. I’m sure I’ll be there in a couple years, but HEY! congratulations you made it.

A few months ago, I had a little seminar/chat thingy with a professor who gave me some tips and tricks on what to do afterward and I thought I’d share with you.

  • Step One: A real career
    • Is it right for you? Do you have roots anywhere? Travel first. Once you get a career, you’re locked in.
      • But a gap in a resume can be killer and draws attention
    • Location: it’s all about your personality, you have to like where you live.
    • Experience with Reservations: don’t get a soul-sucking job
  • Step Two: Welcome to the Jungle
    • What type of gig is it? Don’t appear too desperate when hiring, then you’re easy. Different jobs are connecting points to each other and the latter up.
    • Opportunity: you can have a day job that will support you until you can get to your dream job
    • Culture: Does the company care about their employees? Beware of gimmicks that get you to stay, lack of dental insurance in exchange for free coffee.
    • Are they connected? Big names à working with each other à it’s who you know
  • Step Three: Finding a Job
    • Indeed.com
      • Taylor the portfolio for the company
      • Make it as personal for the hirer as possible
      • Try to drop it off in person; physical rather than digital
    • Shutterfly? Other printing sources
    • Glassdoor.com
    • “Headhunters”… like Creative Circle
      • Pretty much sells you to companies
      • It sucks that the system is rigged, but it happens
    • Network!!!!!
    • Go to visiting artists
      • Don’t be a rude.
      • People want to work with people that they get along with
  • Step Four: Common Creative Gigs
    • Freelance
      • Pro: Your hours, your money, you choose, build your name
      • Con: Client is the boss, TAXES, inconsistency
    • In-house Industry
      • Pro: Doing something you love, clocking in and out (most places don’t pay overtime), moving up
      • Cons: Consistency, politics, glass ceiling, company pace
    • Creative Agency
      • Pro: Creative living, variety, good pay, great opportunities
      • Cons: Small fish big pond, design culture can suck, trust in leadership
  • Step Five: Present Your Work
    • Know the market: be prepared, double check, present your work, don’t be vague
    • Fake it ‘til you make it
    • Student work: have you peaked? Continue to work, work outside of class
    • Portfolio site, is it updated? It should be about the work that you want to do.
    • A little mystery is okay, but don’t go crazy
    • 10-16 pages of work…20 maximum; make it efficient
    • Reels: 2:30 or less. Make it good enough that they want to see more
  • Step Six: Resume
    • Keep it clean, HR doesn’t care about your icons; it’s a resume not a poster
    • It’s not fun
    • Make it easy for them to see the information
    • It doesn’t need to be cute or creative
    • Copy and paste will make your life easy
  • Step Seven: Showcasing
    • Know the role you want; assess your clients’ needs
    • Don’t include every piece of work
      • That lucky shot isn’t enough; you have to be able to nail it
    • Photo and video are mashed together now, am I skilled for that?
    • Understand your client
      • Your reel should reflect the clients
    • Music selection can make or break you; play it safe
      • Audiojungle.com
    • Viewer fatigue is real
    • Show work that benefits the employer and the customer
    • Explain your role
      • Context to show how you work
    • A wide range of work is okay
      • Unless you’re going for specific companies
    • Make your portfolio easy to update
      • Make it presentable in every way
      • It’s okay to have different versions of the portfolio
  • Step Eight: Show That You Care
    • Hard work is obvious
      • So is laziness
    • Half of design is marketing and presentation
    • Where?
      • GraphicBurger, Pixeden, Dribbble, PSDCovers, Behance
      • Not all are free, but they’ll be worth the investment and a tax write-off
    • Showcase your work, but don’t distract
    • Don’t put it on a loaf of bread just because you can
  • Step Nine-ish: Process and Details
    • Employers hire people for talent…and to make it easier
    • Be a jack of all trades on styles, learn how to replicate and understand
    • Show off your ability to conceptualize and execute in short and long term
    • Have 10 ideas and pick the best one
  • Step Nine-ish: Webheads and Tech Nerds
    • UX/UI people
    • Show that you are a great communicator
    • Employers need to see that you can handle structure and a lot of information
  • Step Nine-ish: Photography isn’t Magic
    • Be prepared to achieve the results you promise
    • Show variety
    • Adapt with new technology
    • Do you know your equipment, lighting, and studios?
  • Step Ten: Interviews
    • Congrats!!! You’re qualified!
    • This is NOT show and tell!
      • They’ve already seen your work and they like it.
      • Bring another portfolio with different stuff unique to the employer/company, if you want to
    • Communication is as a creative is employable
      • Communicate with employers, coworkers, clients
  • Step Eleven: Checklist
    • Printed portfolio (or iPad) ready to go
    • An extra copy of your resume
    • Business card, makes you stand out
    • Dress to impress
    • HANDSHAKE
    • Don’t overtalk
    • Be cool, be respectful, be yourself
  • Step Twelve: Interviewing Basics
    • So, why do you want to work here?
      • Research the company
      • Kiss booty
      • Be prepared
    • What can you bring to the table?
      • Note some of the campaigns, expand on ideas, show your own creative thinking
    • What about your process? And your struggles?
      • Stick to the basics
      • Collaborate, learn, adapt
      • Don’t say that you’re a perfectionist.
    • Any questions for us?
      • NEVER SAY NOPE!
      • Ask about their favorite project, challenges
      • Learn
    • Should you follow up?
      • YES
      • Only after an interview
  • Backwards Step One: Didn’t get the Gig
    • Don’t get discouraged
    • Occupy your time
    • Find your stoke
    • Persistence pays off

 

  • Closing Checklist for the Real World
    • You’re outward facing in many ways
      • Control your social media
    • Is your work readily available, how is your brand?
      • Site, reel, business card, resume, portfolio, do they all have the same theme, are they consistent, is it great?
      • Update often
    • Are you evolving?
      • Work will evolve; design and visuals change.
      • Make sure you know the trends
      • Does it look current for what people are paying for?
      • Know what people want
    • Double check the contact
      • Have it simple yourname @gmail.com
      • Make your brand consistent
    • Earn it!!!!
      • Do whatever you can to progressively make yourself better every day.

 

 

If any of this is confusing, comment below so I can clarify for you.

Notes: ISO, Shutter Speed & Aperture!

Exposure

-exposure controls how light and/or dark an image is
-it’s the mixture of all three pillars of photography: ISO, shutter speed and aperture

ISO
-iso is the level of sensitivity of camera to available light
-the lower the level, the less sensitive, the higher= more sensitive
-base iso is the lowest iso number of the sensor, that can produce the highest image quality, without adding noise to the image. Ranges:100-200 (base iso), 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400. Each step in between doubles sensitivity
-With increased sensitivity, there can be more graining

Shutter Speed

-shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter is open
-it’s measured in seconds and fractions of seconds
-slow shutter speeds require tripods and cause blurriness to moving objects
-want a fast shutter speed for taking pictures of sports or flying birds etc.
-want a slow shutter speed if you want to capture paint drying, or a snail moving, stuff like that

Aperture
-aperture is the hole in the lens that lets light into the camera body (the pupil of your eye is the aperture of photography)
-adds dimension by blurring background and bringing subject into focus or makes everything in focus
-diaphragm: stops or blocks light, with the exception of the light that goes through the aperture
-expressed in f-numbers, which are described as f-stops
-f-stops describe the size of the aperture; the bigger the number, the smaller the hole
-if you want the subject in better focus, use a larger f-number. The smaller the hole, the more in focus the subject and the blurrier the background

Composition| Photography Tips For Beginners

If you’re new to photography, and don’t know where to start, I’ve got your back!

Jumping into the world of photography can be a struggle, so I’m going to share my notes from my various photography classes with you, hoping that they help! This first lesson (can we call it that? let’s go with it.) is all about composition, so you can make your photographs as pleasing to the eye as possible!

(Keep in mind that you can’t possibly follow all of these “guidelines” in one picture! Feel free to experiment; the most important ones (to me at least) are the Rule of Thirds and putting the horizon line on one of the Rule of Thirds lines.)

 

  • Rule of Thirds
    • 3×3 frame, don’t put the subject in middle, put it on one of the lines or where they intersect!
    • imagine a number sign, or as our generation says, a hashtag (#)
    • basically, don’t put anything in the centre of your photograph
  • Balance Elements
    • have something on each side
    • imagine the picture as a scale
  • Leading Lines
    • use elements of the scene to create a lined pattern that will draw the viewers eye and allow the eye to follow the lines
    • horizontal lines= static and calm, vertical= permanence and stability, diagonal= drama movement and uncertainty
  • Symmetry and Patterns
    • makes it eye catching
    • creates tension
  • Viewpoint
    • i.e. an upwards angle creates a more powerful feel
    • angle down on the subject (wimpy, sympathetic), angle sideways
    • IDEA! take a picture from lying on your back to get different view
  • Background
    • don’t make it too busy
    • don’t keep it too much in focus, blur it a bit
  • Depth
    • here is where the idea of “you can’t use all of these in one picture” comes in, above I said not to have the background in focus, where below it’ll say to have it in focus. it all depends how you want YOUR picture to be
    • objects in fore, middle and background; layer
  • Framing
    • have stuff around the edge to isolate main subject
    • if you’re taking a picture of a vacant street, use the buildings on both sides to frame it
  • Cropping
    • crop around [small] subject to get rid of noise in background
  • Simplify the Scene
      • basically get rid of clutter, make the background bare or as less busy as possible
    • Use silhouettes by putting the light behind the subject
    • Fill the frame
      • don’t leave empty space
      • zoom in as close as possible to a subject

 

  • Space to Move
    • humans look ahead; if you’re taking a picture of car headed to the left, then leave some empty space to the left of it
  • Colours
    • contrast, not same shade: blue and orange, purple and yellow, red and green, black and white!
  • Use odd numbers
    • more appealing to the eye
    • take a picture of three under water basket weavers instead of two
  • Texture
    • creates dimension (brick, cement, velvet, etc.)
  • Horizontal Line
    • do not put in middle of frame
    • above or below, depending on the image
  • Lean into Frame
    • when photographing animals and people, have them looking into camera

 

 

 

Good luck! Tweet me your pictures @susanarnold_ or tag me in them on Instagram with @susanarnold_