Review for EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING

Everything, Everything by Nicola YoonThis book redefines the YA genre. This inspirational layout is different from any other book I’ve read. EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING is easy to read and heart touching. I think I would have given it a 6/5 if I hadn’t had already seen the movie. (Don’t be mad! It was mother/daughter bonding.)
On the note of already seeing the movie (which I also recommend), it was intriguing to see how the directors adapted the IM, texting, and illustrations from the book to the big screen.
The illustrations really allow the reader to get into the head of Maddy, the protagonist, by seeing the world how she sees it. They also break up the text in ways that make the reading very fast.

Overall, I give it a 5/5.

‘Batman: Nightwalker’ Review

Let me start this review by saying that Batman is my favorite superhero, so I went into this extremely excited to have a fresh take on the Caped Crusader.

Ultimately, I was disappointed. I enjoyed many parts of the book, how little hints of who Bruce would become were woven throughout the chapters, but I’ve seen this plot before, specifically in DC Icons, #1 Wonder Woman: Warbringer. Similarly to Warbringer, there is a rich kid whose father loves their friend more than them in Nightwalker, we also had a similar plottwist involving one of the rich characters (which I won’t describe) in Warbringer, though the plottwist their is more important than here.

Also, every time Madeleine, the antagonist, was described, the words ‘lushous lashes’ followed. I get it, she has good lashes, but every time she is mentioned in the story I don’t need to be reminded of it.

The initial description of Arkham Asylumn reminds me of the prison in Lauren Oliver’s Pandemonium. And the VR gym that Bruce goes to has to be invented soon because I want to go to a gym like that!

I am disappointed that Nightwalker recycled Warbringer’s plot and I am really hoping that Catwoman: Soulstealer doesn’t do the same, otherwise this series of four could turn into the same book with different titles and characters. Here’s to hoping that Catwoman can redeem the DC Icons series.

‘Wonder Woman: Warbringer’ Review

And my obsession with Wonder Woman continues!

I have wanted to read this book since the second I discovered it was coming out. And I was not let down.
‘Wonder Woman: Warbringer’ shows a different Diana and Themyscira than the one that Patty Jenkins showed us in the movie. We see more of this ‘Cult Island,’ as it is called, and we learn more about the Amazon way of life, rules, and regulations. The Amazons and their culture is more developed than in the movie. I really enjoyed seeing Diana in this light, and I don’t want to spoil anything so I won’t develop that any further.

In ‘Wonder Woman: Warbringer’ Diana is innocent. But she is also a kid; seventeen to be exact. She fights being the youngest of her people and being a teenager in modern day New York. That is something that I really enjoyed about the read, Diana was relatable in a way that isn’t really relatable. She doesn’t know how to work a smartphone, has never seen anything plastic, and has never flown in an airplane…but the way she feels about all of these new things is so relatable because we’ve all been there and experienced new things.

The ending was a twist that even I wasn’t expecting, and I’m pretty good at expecting twists. And that’s exactly what brought this book to five stars. The writing was well done, the characters well developed, which I enjoyed. But the twist ending worked. It didn’t seem far-fetched and fit character personalities. The twist ending was a real make it or break it moment; depending on how Leigh Bardugo handled the situation it could have gone off the rails and ruined the entire novel. But it didn’t. It tied it together really well and mended my heart (that had shattered a few pages beforehand).

Over 5/5 stars for a well-written ending that knew it’s characters.

Review of Stephenie Meyer’s ‘Life and Death’

In all honesty, this book was awful.

For the first thirteen pages, I complained after every other sentence. I think that Stephenie Meyer literally went through her Word document that was Twilight and changed Bella to Beau and Edward to Edythe. I felt like I was reading her own version of fanfiction–for her own work! It seemed like such a money grab that I felt dirty reading it at points. And the title? Boring. There was no imagination whatsoever that went into naming Life and Death.

When I forgot what I was reading, though, it felt a lot more natural for the genders to be switched. Now, I haven’t read Twilight in about four or five years, so I don’t know if that impacts how I read this book. But I am a much bigger fan of Edythe and Beau than Bella and Edward.

The storyline felt sloppy, and maybe if I reread Twilight now I would say the same thing. There was hardly a story until the last half of the book, only two people unhealthily obsessed with each other. When Beau finally discovers what Edythe is, that’s when the storyline starts to pick up. And when the antagonists of the story appear (for about the last fifty or so pages) that’s when the action starts to happen. It seems that Meyer missed the first day of her creative writing class: in order to have a story, there has to be something happening…

The end at least was exciting. I don’t want to include any spoilers, but the way the story ended felt natural and not too forced. I wish Twilight had ended that way. If Meyer had continued “rewriting” and had the same ending, it would have begged for more books about Edythe and Beau, which do not need to be written. The wrap-up was well concluded and doesn’t seem to leave anything out.

I think the biggest reason why I’m most frustrated with Life and Death is because Meyer had the incredible opportunity to expand the universe she created and she ignored it. She could have done something similar to J.K. Rowling’s Fantastic Beasts. She could have moved the entire story to Maine or Europe and developed different (yet similar) characters and expanded this world and her franchise. And she blew it! I just don’t understand why she wasted this opportunity.

All in all, I wasn’t the biggest fan of Life and Death.

Kindle: Page Size / Layout / Formatting

I just recently published my debut novel, Blue Vigilante, with CreateSpace (a post on the self-publishing journey to come!). Actually, I just published yesterday. The last 24 hours, after the physical copy of BV was done, I’ve spent frustrated over trying to make a Kindle edition of the book. So, after hours (yes, hours) of searching the internet for an answer, I’ve decided to compile my knowledge into one post with everything on it for anybody else who struggles with what I went through.

HOW TO FORMAT YOUR BOOK TO PUBLISH ON KINDLE*

PAGE SIZE

To be honest, it doesn’t really matter what your page size is. Go with whatever you’re comfortable with. This was the first mistake I made. I tried to resize my entire book, which is 375 6×9 inch pages, to fit the size of a Kindle screen. DON’T do that. Kindle isn’t just a device, it’s also an app which means that the size CHANGES depending on the device used.

Don’t fit your book to the Kindle, fit Kindle to your book.

FORMATTING

Format your book however you would normally. For me that just meant putting my chapter headings in the center, for example:

One

Or making sure that my little section separators were centered as well.

*****

Each book is different and unique, so each format will be different and unique as well.

CHAPTERS/SECTIONS

This is where I struggled the most. No matter how many times I clicked “return” I could not get my pages to be correctly spaced in the preview (ALWAYS check the preview). I struggled so much here because I was too busy focusing on the page size, rather than the tricks I could use to outsmart technology.

If you want to separate one page from the next, do not hit the “return” button, always hit page break. This is located under the “Insert” tab at the top of Word. I have both a PC and a Mac and I checked; it’s located in the same area on both devices.

It will look weird and you will question the formatting. I did. Several times. But trust me, once it’s uploaded onto Kindle Direct Publishing, it will look fine in the previewer. I went through all 375 pages of my book, just to be sure. (I recommend you do the same and double check that your computer listened to you.)

 

 

Good luck publishing! Let me know in the comments if you found this article helpful at all.

*This post is not made for image-heavy books, I would search the internet specifically about images.